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CPTED

Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design

Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED)
. CPTED is a multidisciplinary approach based on the idea that incidents of crime in can be reduced by assessing the physical areas where crimes occur and using the site layout to reduce the opportunity for crime, which when applied, reduces both crime and the fear of crime. A main objective of CPTED is to reduce/remove the opportunity for crime to occur in an environment, and promote positive interaction with the space by legitimate users. CPTED is a preventative, pro-active model, and not a reactive one.

When CPTED is put into practice, the resulting environment - including the building and its surroundings - will discourage or impede criminal behavior, and at the same time encourage honest citizens to keep a watchful eye.

The Four Principles of CPTED:

Natural Surveillance
Natural Access Control
Territorial Reinforcement
Maintenance

Natural Surveillance

"See and be seen" is the overall goal when it comes to CPTED and natural surveillance. A person is less likely to commit a crime if they think someone will see them do it. Lighting and landscape play an important role in Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design. Keep areas well lit. In particular, building entrances should be bright at all times and provide a clear line of sight from both inside and outside. Eliminate hiding spots. Cut down hedges and remove trees, bushes, fences, dumpsters that create blind spots or hiding places.

The result: A potential offender should feel like they are being watched, and that the surroundings offer no easy escape routes.

Natural Access Control

Natural Access Control is more than a high block wall topped with barbed wire. CPTED utilizes the use of walkways, fences, lighting, signage and landscape to clearly guide people and vehicles to and from the proper entrances. The goal with this CPTED principle is not necessarily to keep intruders out, but to direct the flow of people while decreasing the opportunity for crime.

Territorial Reinforcement

The purpose of this principle is to create a clear distinction between public and private property. This is important for two reasons: Legitimate occupants have a sense of ownership and will notice, and even challenge, people who don't belong; intruders, on the other hand, have a harder time blending in. Public areas are clearly distinguished from private ones. Potential trespassers perceive this control and are thereby discouraged.

Maintenance

Maintenance is related to territorial reinforcement. A well -maintained area sends the message that people notice and care about what happens in an area. This, in turn, discourages vandalism and other crimes.

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